Dos and don'ts at Oktoberfest

25 Sep

Dancing — yes, please!

Having a beer in a festival tent is a must for every Wiesn visitor. Once you're inside, you'll be carried away by the music and the fun. People sway and dance. The rules are quite clear: on benches, yes, but not on tables. Whoever tries to dance on a table risks being thrown out. And it would be a shame for a visit to Oktoberfest to end like that.

 

Bringing your own food — no!

A beer tent isn't a beer garden! That's why you're not allowed to bring your own food. Those who do are quickly thrown out. Usually there are beer gardens in front of the tents where you can enjoy your snack without upsetting anyone.

 

Hendl chicken — yes, delicious!

Anyone who drinks needs food to line their stomach. Hendl — Bavarian for roast chicken — is the perfect choice: Crispy, greasy and easy to eat with your fingers. To prevent beer mugs from slipping out of your hands after the meal, wipes are included.


What is happening on the planet and in each particular city

right now and any future day, you can find out here:

https://ixyt.info/en/Germany/Mahlsdorf

Paste the desired city into this link!

 

Liftoff — yeahaaaa!

The Olympia Looping rollercoaster serves only one purpose — fun! But wait a minute: every Oktoberfest visitor should consider the order of their Wiesn activities. Our recommendation: First rollercoaster, then chicken and beer. Otherwise, centrifugal forces might have a devastating effect on the stomach.

 

Flirting — yes, but of course!

Bavarian traditional attire is clever. It gives you the chance to let people know your relationship status. If you tie the apron bow of your dirndl on the right, it means you're in a relationship. If you tie it on the left, it means you're single.

 

Drinking beer — yes, most certainly!

Drinking beer at the Wiesn is a rigorous sport-like activity, especially for the upper arms. The beer is served in liter mugs and its consumption requires some stamina. But one must drink correctly: Only grasp the handle, not the whole glass. It's not for those with weak wrists — though some revelers (pictured) still have some practice to do.

 

Drink too much beer — absolute no-no!

Getting tipsy is part of the Wiesn fun. But binge drinking is simply ugly. People who stumble around Oktoberfest drunk and who empty the contents of their stomach into the crowd spoil the event for themselves and others. After all, you didn't come all the way to Munich to forget everything because you drank too much.

 

Peeing in public — no way, yuck!

At some point, your bladder will start complaining about all the beer you have drunk. But whatever you do, don't get put off by the queues in front of the toilets and urinate behind the tents. You wouldn't do that at home either, would you? Getting caught incurs a fine of up to €100 (about $96). So it's better to plan in enough time to make your way to the next toilet — there are hundreds of them.

 

Stealing a beer mug — no, not under any circumstances!

Admittedly, it is a coveted souvenir. And some people think they'll just take the mug with them. Every year thousands of beer mugs disappear. Not a good idea: Stealing a beer mug is theft. And that means a fine! So it's better to buy one. It's marked with a colorful plaque, identifying it as an honestly acquired beer mug.

 

Keeping a seat free — no, that's very uncool

Tables like these in the beer tents are in great demand. The tents regularly have to close their doors to newcomers due to overcrowding, especially on weekends. Nevertheless: Do not ever take a bench and reserve it for friends. Service personnel and stewards will quickly ensure that the free seating is offered to waiting patrons.

 

Photographing topless exhibitionists — no way!

Taking pictures of women in a party mood is OK. But it's definitely not OK to photograph women who spontaneously take their tops off, called Blankzieherinnen in German. Stripping isn't the problem — photographing people who do it is. Women don't want their Wiesn striptease going global on the internet. What happens in the tent stays in the tent.

 

Author Anne Termèche (sbc)

Permalink - https://p.dw.com/p/359Fu


Leave a comment